New Work

Hybrid Altar

A collaboration between Diane Williams and Ching Ching Cheng

Hybrid Altar” is an interactive installation by artists, Ching Ching Cheng and Diane Williams. This installation explores identity that traces back from our cultural lineage. Both of us are immigrants from our respective countries of Taiwan and Philippines. Colonization heavily influenced our customs and traditions. Taiwan was under Japanese rule and the Philippines was colonized by Spain, United States, and briefly by Japan.Under foreign rule, our countries developed unique cultures and rituals that are practiced today but as time passes, we forget the “what” and the “why” of these rituals and their origins. A popular tradition in the U.S. is theWishing Fountain (toss-a-coin-make-a-wish), a European folklore where any spoken wish would be granted. It isa ritual that everyone performs yet very few people know the history of this tradition. It originated from early European tribes who believed that the water from potable holes was a gift from the gods.

Hybrid Altar” is an experience of mixed ceremonial rituals. It is constructed with an environment made of yarn, fabric and plastic woven into wires that are supported by two, 6’ and 4’ metal poles in cement blocks, and a fountain in the center for the offering ritual, surrounded by Chinese gods on Greek columns made of plaster and wood. The yarn and fabric are recycled from friends and family or salvaged from stores that are traditionally owned and operated by immigrants. They provide connections with the histories and memories of Diane’s community as well as the Catholic religion she was brought up in. Under the Chinese gods and fountain is a woven mat, made from the same materials, with the words, “TULOY” meaning welcome in Tagalog, the main language in the Philippines, referencing the Filipino hospitality during a religious fiesta.Ching explored the popular Chinese gods in Chinatown located in Los Angeles, then modified and mass-produced these statues with Greek mythology influences. The immersive display of the gods and the offerings are based on the ceremonial tradition in Taiwanese temples. 

This collaborative work addresses cultural structures, questioning norms and assumptions that we all have, regardless of where we are from. These traditions are often seen in our daily practices, beliefs and routines that we put so much value. “Hybrid Altar” is our version of an altar that combines iconic symbols and representations of the cultures we grew up in with figures and materials that are reminiscent of our present lives in Los Angeles. The public is invited to participate in a scavenger hunt, looking for iconic symbols: baby Jesus, flowers, Chinese coins, angels etc. hidden near the installation then placing them in the “Hybrid Altar”.

 

 

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Outdoor installation at Atche Art Space

 

 

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Diane Williams
Diverted Destruction

I’m in Diverted Destruction opening June 23, 2018 at Loft at Liz’s 7-10pm.  

The mission of Diverted Destruction has always been to inspire people to be creative with all the things we throw away in our daily lives. This year, in light of the political atmosphere, immigration policies, war, and having seen the documentary Human Flow by Ai Wei Wei, Liz Gordon the curator, was inspired to investigate The Human Condition with selected women artists from a variety of cultural backgrounds.

Roz Myles, Fana Babadayo, Ching Ching Cheng, Linda Vallejo, Alexandra Dillon, Camilla Taylor, Marjan Vayghan, Diane Williams and Kathi Flood.

 

 

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Diane Williams
Catalyze at Atche

I’m hosting a show at my newest art space in my residencial backyard with artists: Chenhung Chen and Dani Dodge in the Gallery, Scott Froschauer will be showing one of his positive street signs, Kira Vollman and Joe Berardi from Non Credo will be performing their experimental music in the music studio and Ching Ching Chen and I will be debuting our outdoor, interactive  installation collaboration. 

Food and refreshments will be served!

May 27, 2018

3-6pm

3908 Wawona St. 

Los Angeles, Ca 90065

 

 Atche Art Space located in Glassell Park  A sister Gallery of the Shed Collective 

Atche Art Space located in Glassell Park

A sister Gallery of the Shed Collective 

Diane Williams
Los Angeles Magazine article

"In her solo exhibition titled INcongruence, eight woven banners hang from the ceiling, a levitation act accomplished through imperceptible clear wire. Each piece is a chaotic amalgamation of colors and textures, with a single word boldly woven in the center: “Immigrant,” “Fear,” “We,” or “Migrant.” Inspired by recent rallies and demonstrations, the pieces function as conceptual protest signs. Yet unlike the signs you’ll find in the streets, Williams’s pieces don’t explicitly declare an opinion or statement. Instead, she urges viewers to examine their own emotional responses to the singular woven words." ---Andrea Alonso, Los Angeles Magazine

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Diane Williams
Highlights from Beautiful Creatures at Cerritos College Gallery

Thank you to everyone who came out to see Beautiful Creatures at Cerritos College Art Gallery last night. The installation has been extended thru Feb. 23rd. There is an opening in the main gallery on Tuesday, Feb. 20th featuring the work of Sonja Schenk from 5-7pm. Be sure to stop by. Here are some of the highlights from the installation.

 

Beatiful Creatures | Cerritos College Gallery
Diane Williams

PRESS RELEASE

Diane Williams | Cerritos College Gallery

“Beautiful Creatures”

A solo show exhibition as part of the Window Dressing Series at Cerritos College Gallery

11110 Alondra Blvd., Norwalk, California 90650

Opening Reception: February 12, 2018, 4pm - 6pm

On view through February 16, 2018

Diane Williams is a multidisciplinary artist whose work stems from the political and social landscape that surrounds her—specifically the ethnically diverse neighborhoods of Los Angeles. She uses art as a call to arms, creating works that explore issues about immigrants and gender to encourage cultural and social understanding.

Williams’ installation, “Beautiful Creatures”, will mimic the stereotypical presentation of commercial storefront displays, but with a surreal twist. The featured objects on display will be pulled from her “Monsters & Aliens” series, which involved the creation of abstract masks, monstrous (self) portraits, made out of shredded paintings and other discarded materials. The masks will be placed on mannequins and custom-made stands, combined with shredded acrylic paintings scattered on the floor and cut-up gel rolls hanging from the ceiling. These materials are semi-translucent, diffusing light in a pleasant aesthetic amalgamation, and obscuring the masked female object, subverting the way we are conditioned to see the unfamiliar as only-ever the frightening ‘Other’ - the outsider, the monster, the alien – replaced instead by fascinating, beautiful creatures.

 

About Diane Williams

Williams earned her BFA degree from California State University, Long Beach in 2013. Her work has been featured in select publications and exhibited in solo shows and several group exhibitions including With Liberty and Justice for Some at Walter Maciel, Culver City, Personal Narrative at the Annenberg Beach House Gallery, Santa Monica (2017), My America, a community activation at Museum of Art and History, MOAH in 2017, Countenance Divine, at Gallery 825, Los Angeles, with works in both private and public collections including the National Immigration Law Center, Los Angeles and Washington DC (2016) and Azusa Pacific University (2017). She’s currently working on a solo show in March of 2018 at Gallery 825 in Los Angeles, Ca.

www.dianewilliamsartist.com

About Cerritos College

The mission of the Cerritos College Art Gallery is to serve as an educational, social and culture enhancement for the Cerritos academic population as well as the immediate surrounding communities.

The Cerritos College Art Gallery presents rotating exhibitions highlighting the work of emerging and mid-career artists. A special emphasis is placed on works that confront challenging and pressing issues in contemporary art and culture. In support of exhibitions, the Cerritos College Art Gallery also regularly hosts workshops, lectures, and performances.

Common Thread

I’ve been busy working on some projects. My newest is an installation with large modules. This structure is made out of wires, shredded oil and acrylic paintings on canvas and paper, manipulated fabric, yarn that I twisted and dyed, rope and felt fabric. These materials connect myself and the immigrant communities in Los Angeles.

 Module 1 of 4

Module 1 of 4

 

The notion of specificity and intent has been on my mind a lot lately, which I hope to translate into my art. I’m interested in using materials for this specific project that have meaning to me. This is why I use elements that have personal history, discarded or hand me downs, fabric that I purchased from my neighborhood Thrift Shop in Glassell Park and the fabric district in Downtown Los Angeles called Santee Alley, both places are frequented by myself as well as many lower and middle income immigrant families.  The idea is to weave these materials into structures and sculptures. They are fragments of my life as an immigrant and as an American, living and working in Los Angeles.       

Diane Williams
Los Angeles Artist Collectives you should Check out!

My latest contribution on Art and Cake, an online contemporary art magazine based in Los Angeles, CA. 

Los Angeles Artist Collectives You Should Check Out

Los Angeles Artist Collectives You Should Check Out By Diane Williams Breaking through the art world has never been more challenging. Folding or merging art galleries and limited government funded art programs are making the competition extremely high along with the saturation of artists producing and showing artwork.

Diane Williams: My America | Lancaster Museum of Art and History - MOAH

Saturday, September 9th, 2017

5pm-9pm

Lancaster Museum of Art and History – MOAH

665 W Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster, CA 93534

Join the Lancaster Museum of Art and History and multidisciplinary artist Diane Williams at Celebrate America on The BLVD for the next installment of her site specific project, My America.

My America is William's recent body of work about finding common ground with the community at large. She will be engaging visitors to celebrate America on the intersection of Lancaster Blvd and Cedar Avenue.

Diane Williams is a multidisciplinary artist whose work stems from the political and social landscape that surrounds her. She uses art as a call to arms, creating works that explore issues about immigrants and gender to encourage cultural and social understanding.

Williams will be engaging the public with the 2nd installment of her participatory piece,  “My America”. She will ask viewers to write the first name of an immigrant they know and their relationship to that person on a piece of paper and then post it on a wall. Collectively illustrating the idea of an extended community.

https://www.facebook.com/events/142606743003726

For more information, visit Diane William's website at www.dianewilliamsartist.com/my-america

 

 1st installment of My America at Shoebox Projects, an experimental project space in Los Angeles, Ca. Photo credit: Kristine Schomaker

1st installment of My America at Shoebox Projects, an experimental project space in Los Angeles, Ca. Photo credit: Kristine Schomaker

Today in the Studio

I have been getting up early every morning to work in the studio to beat the heat. So far I have managed to do some sketches on possible ideas, art projects and started on a new piece that is in a very awkward stage. Lately, my enthusiasm to want to create and look forward to being in the studio has been dwindling. Being in my tiny backyard studio has been quite a release and satisfying in the past but has been grueling and with much resistance on my part these days. Perhaps it's the summer heat + the climate change factor, the constant barrage of negative political rhetoric on social media and other news outlets, the current upheaval and discontent in my own community, the art proposal rejections one after another or maybe it’s the subject of my work that is weighing down on me. Nevertheless, I know this sentiment will pass and I will continue to persevere. I fervently believe in my own work as it offers something important and rewarding to me.

As a constant reminder from my past professor in art school –

Be bold!

No excuses!

 

 Very early work in progress. Needs a lot of progress at this point!  

Very early work in progress. Needs a lot of progress at this point!  

 My tiny backyard studio

My tiny backyard studio

Diane Williams
Closing Reception of "My America"

The residency at Shoebox Projects ended with a fun closing reception. I'm grateful to everyone who braved the unusually extreme hot weather that day to see the closing of my month long residency. The project was experimental and site specific. The installation, Common Thread was an ephemeral piece that took hours to put up and more hours to take down. The immigrant wall where viewers were asked to write down a name of an immigrant and their relation to the person was an enlightening project. Many conversations were sparked by all the pieces specially the #alien piece which illustrates the numbers of hate groups in America from the hate fighting and tenacious organization, Southen Poverty Law Center - SPLC. I'm thankful for this experience and grateful for the support of Shoebox Projects and Kristine Schomaker. 

 

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Diane Williams
Last week at Shoebox Projects

My experimental project ends this weekend. Closing reception is this Saturday, July 8th from 3-6pm. Shoebox Projects is at the Brewery artist lofts in Lincoln Heights. 660 S Ave 21 #3 Los Angeles, CA

 

 The wall is filling up with names

The wall is filling up with names

 Common Thread Installation is almost complete

Common Thread Installation is almost complete

Mujer Inmigrante  

Diane Williams
Working at Shoebox Projects Residency

Thanks to everyone who have participated in the "My America" wall and the visits are of course, always appreciated and much welcomed. The residency closes July 9th with a closing reception on July 8th from 3-6pm! Here is the work in progress in pictures. Stay tuned for more. 

 

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Diane Williams
Mid Residency at Shoebox Projects

Im making a lot of progress with my work at Shoebox Projects. I'm loving the experimental aspect of the residency and enjoying the conversations that stem from the work. Shoebox Projects is an experimental space by Kristine Schomaker, director of Shoebox PR and Art and Cake. The space gives artists the opportunity to work on new and site specific projects. 

 Common Threads installation work in progress

Common Threads installation work in progress

 Common Threads installation work in progress

Common Threads installation work in progress

 Common Threads installation work in progress 

Common Threads installation work in progress 

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 Common Thread--installation work in progress, Mujer Inmigrante video 

Common Thread--installation work in progress, Mujer Inmigrante video 

 My America--interactive installation   

My America--interactive installation   

 Alien installation  

Alien installation  

 One of the many conversations from artists and friends who visit. Photo by Kristine Schomaker. In photo, left: Diane Williams Right: Pranay Reddy

One of the many conversations from artists and friends who visit. Photo by Kristine Schomaker. In photo, left: Diane Williams Right: Pranay Reddy

Diane Williams
We: Visual Reflections of the American Experiment

Exhibition dates: June 15 – 18, 2017
Reception: Thursday, June 15, 4-6 PM

“We” is an exhibition that re-affirms the root aspirations of the American experiment. As our public political discourse has become increasingly toxic and polarized, we return to the core unifying claims of the United States Constitution — that “we the people” have a collective vested interest in the pursuit of certain ideals expressed concisely in the Preamble: “establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty”. These pursuits remain just as vital today as they were in 1787.

This group exhibition features invited artists to reconsider the immediacy of these core themes of Justice, Peace, Defense, Welfare, and Liberty; exploring the myriad ways these constitutional aspirations remain active challenges to our pursuit of unity as “we the people” in America today.

The suite of images is taken through each participating artist’s mobile device dating from the beginning through midway this year. Each photograph captures instantaneous, raw reflections of everyday life while evoking emotions, and insights into the human condition during the first half of 2017.

FEATURED ARTISTS
Kent Anderson Butler
Caesar Alzate Jr.
James Barsalou
Mark Batongmalaque
Mayte Escobar
Teresita de la Torre
Lauren Halsey
D. Hill
Eric L. Jones
Paul Kelley
Nery Gabriel Lemus
Nikolay Maslov
Amitis Motevalli
Douglas McCulloh
Cody Norris
Naida Osline
Juliana Rico
Steve Thomas
Diane Williams
Jake Williams
Samira Yamin

"We: Visual Reflections of the American Experiment" is organized by Alyssa Cordova, Assistant Curator, Orange County Museum of Art, Jennifer Frias, Associate Curator, Sweeney Art Gallery, UC Riverside, and Jeff Rau, Director and Curator, Earl and Virginia Green Art Gallery, Biola University.

Photo courtesy of Diane Williams.

https://www.facebook.com/events/834526670044797/

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Diane Williams
First week at Shoebox Projects, an experimental space.

Still a few more things to complete "My America". I'm enjoying the experimental aspect of the residency, working and re working to see what works and what doesn't work within the space and how each pieces responds to each other and make the whole project connect. 

 

 

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More work to do on this installation  

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Participatory piece needs more participants and soon will be a wall of immigrants

Diane Williams
Diane Williams | My America
Fractured but not Broken

“My America”

Artist residency and exhibition at Shoebox Projects

660 South Avenue 21 #3

Los Angeles, CA 90031

 

Residency from June 5 – July 9, 2017

Closing reception: Saturday, July 8th, 3pm - 6pm

www.dianewilliamsartist.com

 

Diane Williams is a multidisciplinary artist whose work stems from the political and social landscape that surrounds her—specifically the ethnically diverse neighborhoods of Los Angeles. She uses art as a call to arms, creating works that explore issues about immigrants and gender to encouraging cultural and social understanding.

 

In her series Monsters & Aliens, Williams created masks woven from shredded paintings and discarded materials and wore these masks in performances where the masks clearly signed for “other.” She wanted viewers to question what they feared from strangers and to begin to examine their own prejudices with respect to race and gender. In a mixed media work entitled Fractured but not Broken, she also displayed the masked and fragmented female body-- depicting the disparate body parts in photographs and drawings, overlaid with Plexiglas and blue and yellow duralar. This human scaled work confronted viewers declaring, “see me for who I am -- not as a cultural stereotype.”

 

During her residency at Shoebox Projects, Williams will create a site-specific installation that further explores ideas of marginalization by physically dividing the space. In addition, she will embark on a new series of works that track the surges in hate crimes since the inauguration of President Trump. In her work, Williams seeks to find a common ground between the works she makes and the community at large. For example in the participatory piece, This in my America, she asks viewers to write the first name of an immigrant they know and their relationship to that person on a piece of paper and then post it on a wall. Collectively illustrating the idea of an extended community.

 

About the artist:

Diane Williams is a multi disciplinary artist and an emerging curator living and working in Los Angeles, CA. She earned her BFA degree from California State University, Long Beach in 2013. Her work has been featured in select publications and exhibited in solo shows and several group exhibitions including Personal Narrative at the Annenberg Beach House Gallery, Santa Monica, With Liberty and Justice for Some at Walter Maciel, Culver City (2017), Countenance Divine, at Gallery 825, Los Angeles, and Defend & Advance, National Immigration Law Center, Los Angeles (2016).

 

About Shoebox Projects:

Shoebox Projects is a new experimental art space in DTLA, where emerging and mid-career artists are given an opportunity to freely experiment with new ideas and directions for their practice. Founded by Kristine Schomaker, multimedia artist and director of Shoebox PR and Art and Cake, Shoebox Projects intends to give artists a chance to recharge and renew their relationship with their work.

 

Diane Williams
Exotic

I have not done a drawing piece in a long time and how I miss it! Check out the progress shots from start to finish.  

Exotic

36" x 60"

Charcoal and conte crayon on paper

 2 hrs

2 hrs

 4 hrs

4 hrs

 6 hrs

6 hrs

 10 hrs. Finished drawing!

10 hrs. Finished drawing!

Diane Williams